Homebrewing blogs

Denali, Hazy Daze... NEIPA!

The Mad Fermentationist - Mon, 04/16/2018 - 3:22pm
I’ve given up writing recipes with more than one new-to-me hop variety. When the beer is ready, I don't know which one to credit (or blame). Only a handful of varieties are able to carry an IPA alone, so I often avoid SMaSH recipes too. I’d heard good things about Denali (aka Nuggetzilla, 06277), specifically that it contributes big-punchy pineapple. That didn’t seem like what I wanted as the only aroma in an IPA though, rather it struck me as a nice combination with a couple of my favorites: Simcoe and Citra! If the beer isn't good, I'll know who to blame. I have a pound of Cashmere in the freezer waiting for similar treatment in another batch of NEIPA.

For hop-timing, I changed things up slightly. Usually right at flame-out I add a big dose that I whirlpool 30 minute to impart the mouth-filling flavor that supports the aroma from dry hopping. In this case though, Scott talked me into adding some of the hops right as I started chilling. Quick chilling was a big emphasis for hoppy beers when I started brewing. In 2012 I transitioned to the hop-stand/whirlpool which immediately improved the character of my hoppy beers. Since then I have occasionally dabbled in splitting additions, but have mostly settled on the single large dose without pre-chilling. Scott mentioned that while researching his book-in-progress (The New IPA) he's read studies that suggest that the concentration of certain aromatics peak almost instantly. The question is, are during-chilling additions the most effective way to impart aroma, or are dry hops accomplishing that goal more effectively?

I also wanted to trial Hazy Daze (which The Yeast Bay just “promoted” to full production). This is a three-strain blend intended for hazy IPAs which they say contributes "peach, apricot, nectarine and grapefruit citrus esters." I thought it might be related to the three dried-yeast blend I used, but from the taste there aren’t noticeable phenols or nearly the banana or bubblegum it produced. For the rest of the wort I pitched London III, as a control.

Next NEIPA in the pipeline will be a fresh batch of Cheater Hops: Citra Galaxy to pour at the Maryland Craft Beer Festival on 5/12 in Frederick!


London III 

Smell – When it was first tapped it was pineapple juice, and not much else. Not artificial or objectionable, but assertive. It was the first thing I smelled, and the first thing my sister-in-law said when she tried an uncarbonated sample. While that character is still present it has mellowed, melding with the Citra into an interesting mix of orange, melon, and pineapple.

Appearance – Hazy glowing body. I’m sure a few readers will complain that it isn’t milky enough… I’m just too good of a brewer! Or we can blame the oat flour… I don’t want murky, muddy, or yeasty. Head and lacing are nice, despite the lack of Chit malt and hop extract.

Taste – The pineapple is the signature character, but it finishes all Citra-melon. A touch of hoppy-resin helps and present bitterness to balance the fruit. It is juicy, but not a juice-bomb. Malt is subdued, just a slight fullness in the middle. Not distinctly oaty. Solid bitterness, balanced by a fair sweetness.

Mouthfeel – Pillowy, rounded, all the good stuff. Moderate carbonation.

Drinkability & Notes – The London III lets the hops speak. Not nose-in-the-hop-bag, but they retain their essence. The Denali has some of the same notes I associate with Sacch Trois (pineapple and a little sweaty), I think together they’d be too much.

Changes for Next Time – I might back Denali down to 1/3 of the hop blend with this yeast, but it is really fun as is. Denali could go nicely with the banana of a hefeweizen strain. Not something I would have thought about a hop that is mostly Columbus and Nugget parentage.

Hazy Daze

Smell – This half is somewhat less varietal, more citrus (tangerine) and less pineapple. It isn’t as obviously “hoppy” with more yeast-hop melding. I don't get anything extra special from the addition of hops during the chill, but then it is hard to know what to look for when using a new hop. Might be a little more aromatic that my last batch or two.

Appearance – Perfect creamy head, great retention and lacing. Yellow, plenty hazy for my preferences, no murk or particulate.

Taste – Tastes drier, brighter, and more bitter than the other half. Still a relatively restrained bitterness compared to some NEIPAs. The hop flavor (citrus, pineapple, melon) is saturated throughout. Really full of flavor, and enough variety to keep me going back. Only mild sweetness, not especially rich.

Mouthfeel – Smooth, with just a hint of hop-astringency. Not quite as full as the best creamiest versions, but a bit more drinkable with the sudden warm weather.

Drinkability & Notes – Bright, hoppy, and not exactly like the typical blend of hops. The yeast helps to keep it drinkable.

Changes for Next Time – With the “alteration” to the hop character this blend seems like a great candidate for getting a citrusy hazy IPA without breaking the bank on fancy hops. I’d like to try this one in the Cheaper Hops paradigm.

Denali Haze

Batch Size: 11.50 gal
SRM: 4.2
IBU: 52
OG: 1.062
FG: 1.014/1.013
ABV: 6.3%/6.4%
Final pH: 4.61/4.70
Brewhouse Efficiency: 68%
Boil Time: 75 mins

Fermentables
----------------
90.4% - 26 lbs Rahr 2-Row Brewer's Malt
7.0 % - 2 lbs Arrowhead Mills Oat Flour
2.6 % -.75 lbs Briess Caramel 10

Mash
-------
Mash In - 45 min @ 154F

Hops
-------
1.00 oz Denali (Pellets, 14.00% AA) @ 15 min
1.00 oz Simcoe (Pellets, 13.20% AA) @ 15 min
3.00 oz Denali (Pellets, 14.00% AA) @ Flame-out (30 min whirlpool)
3.00 oz Simcoe (Pellets, 13.20% AA) @ Flame-out (30 min whirlpool)
2.00 oz Denali (Pellets, 14.00% AA) @ 180F (rapid chill)
2.00 oz Simcoe (Pellets, 13.20% AA) @ 180F (rapid chill)
6.00 oz Citra (Pellets, 12.40% AA) @ Dry Hop Day 3
6.00 oz Denali (Pellets, 14.00% AA) @ Dry Hop Day 3
4.00 oz Citra (Pellets, 12.40% AA) @ Keg Hop
4.00 oz Denali (Pellets, 14.00% AA) @ Keg Hop

Water
-------
19 g Calcium Chloride
15 g Gypsum (Calcium Sulfate)
5 tsp Phosphoric Acid 10%
Calcium Chloride Sulfate Sodium Magnesium Carbonate 145 145 145 10 5 50
Other
-------
1 Whirlfloc Tablet @ 5 mins

Yeast
-------
Wyeast 1318 - London Ale III
The Yeast Bay Hazy Daze

Notes
-------
Brewed 3/18/18

Mashed with 9 gallons filtered DC tap and 6 gallons of distilled. pH 5.45 with 3 tsp phosphoric, so added 2 tsp more.

Lost a gallon of wort not closing the kettle valve before the transfer started... spraged with an extra gallon to make up for it and extended the boil.

Added first dose of whirlpool hops at flame-out. After 30 minutes naturally cooled to 180F. Dumped the first dose of hops, started the chiller and added the next dose to the spider for better contact.

Chilled to 67F, shook to aerate, pitched yeast. Both were packaged mid-January. No starter.

Left at 66F to ferment. Beer temperature 65F up to 67F by day 3.

3/21/18 Dry hopped both with 3 oz each of Citra and Denali. Still good krausens.

3/20/18 Kegged each with 1.5 oz of table sugar boiled in water and 1 g of CBC-1 without rehydration. Left at room temperature to carbonate. Under-primed to avoid the over-carbonation issues with Cheater Hops v1.

1318 FG = 1.014 (not enough beer left over to measure Hazy Daze).

4/3/18 Moved both to 38F. No apparent over-carbonation (thanks to no Mosaic?), if anything lower than expected.

4/13/18 Measured FG after warming decarbonating samples.

I get a commission if you buy something after clicking the links to MoreBeer/Amazon/Adventures in Homebrewing/Great Fermentations!
Categories: Homebrewing blogs

NewAir AB1200B Review – Cool Beer Fridge

Brew Dudes - Wed, 04/04/2018 - 6:00pm

Every once in a while we get equipment to review. This time around, we got a fridge. It’s a pretty cool fridge. Pun intended. The peeps at NewAir have sent out a few of these refrigerators to other bloggers and vloggers to try them out but These Brew Dudes, well, they try harder. Take a […]

The post NewAir AB1200B Review – Cool Beer Fridge appeared first on Brew Dudes.

Categories: Homebrewing blogs

Belgian Dubbel Pomegranate Recipe

The Mad Fermentationist - Mon, 04/02/2018 - 4:04pm
In 2012 a neighbor and I brewed a Belgian Quad for Easter, spiced with cardamom and boosted with pomegranate molasses instead of dark candi syrup. I only retained a six-pack of bottles for myself before kegging the rest for his congregation's Easter vigil, but I was pleased with the results. Since then I'd also used pomegranate molasses in Dark Saison VIII.

Audrey enjoyed the quad enough that she decided to brew a lower-gravity dubbel version to put on tap. We dropped the table sugar, and swapped out the CaraMunich for an English medium crystal (based on availability). We pitched half of the wort with WLP530 (Westmalle), which I'd used for the original batch. For the rest, we pitched Imperial Monastic (Chimay).

Rather than put both beers on tap next to each other (the kegerator was already packed) we tasted both before kegging. The WLP530 was more balanced, with a nice mix of spice and fruit. The Monastic had too much banana (isoamyl acetate) for our tastes despite fermenting in the low-70s. We decided to rack that one to secondary and pitch The Yeast Bay's House Sour Blend. We'll probably give it a dose of pomegranate juice before bottling.

This also seemed like a suitable warm-up for our first trip to Belgium in a couple months for our fifth anniversary! With the Sapwood Cellar opening looming this summer, it seemed like it might be my last chance to travel for now.

Pom-Dom

Smell – Balanced Belgian peppery yeast spice and dark fruitiness. Still has a fresh grainiess as well, something that you almost never get from imported dubbels. Neither the pomegranate molasses nor cardamom immediately jump out. It has a slight morning pastry character, which may be the influence of the spice.

Appearance – Hazy leathery-maroon body with an off-white head. Retention and lacing are both underwhelming. Not a particularly appealing beer to look at it.

Taste – The pomegranate shows itself more in the palate, it’s light acidity lending a crisper finish than a usual dubbel. Lingering subtle red jamminess from the fruit. Again the spice character is primarily the peppery phenols from the yeast, perhaps melding with the cardamom to make it seem more sweet than savory. Caramel notes, but lacks the typical raisin that would be provided by Special B in many recipes. Minimal bitterness. No strong character from the Carafa II, despite not being dehusked.

Mouthfeel – Slightly full for a moderate-strength dubbel. Mildly prickly carbonation, bottle conditioning would be nice to serve it with more sparkle.

Drinkability & Notes – A really nice twist on a Belgian style that doesn’t walk all over the base beer. As Stan Hieronymus notes in Brew Like a Monk, "if the drinker can name the spices, it's a sign they are overdone."

Changes for Next Time – Not sure what is up with the appearance. On one hand it would be nice to add wheat to boost the head retention, on the other I wouldn’t want to add more haze. Hopefully with continued conditioning it clears up.

Recipe

Batch Size: 11.50 gal
SRM: 15.8
IBU: 21.4
OG: 1.058
FG: 1.011
ABV: 6.2%
Final pH: 3.87
Brewhouse Efficiency: 73%
Boil Time: 90 min

Fermentables
-----------------
41.5% - 10 lbs Rahr 2-Row Brewer's Malt
41.5% - 10 lbs Dingemans Pilsen
8.3% - 2 lbs Thomas Fawcett Crystal Malt II
1.6% - .375 lbs Weyermann Carafa II
7.3% - 1.75 lbs Al Wadi Pomegranate Molasses

Mash
-------
Mash In - 45 min @ 152F

Hops
-------
2.00 oz Hallertauer Mittelfrueh (Pellets, 2.40% AA) @ 60 min
1.00 oz Northern Brewer (Pellets, 9.10% AA) @ 60 min

Water
-------
8 g Calcium Chloride @ Mash

CalciumChlorideSulfateSodiumMagnesiumCarbonate808550151090
Other
-------
1 Whirlfloc Tablet @ 5 min
0.50 g Penzeys Guatemala Ground Cardamom Seeds @ 3 min

Yeast
-------
White Labs WLP530 Abbey Ale
/
Imperial Yeast B63 Monastic
The Yeast Bay House Sour

Notes
-------
Brewed 2/25 - Extended the boil as efficiency was lower than expected.

Fermenting beer temperature peaked at 74F. If I'd looked up the origin of the B63 before fermentation I would have suggested keeping it cooler despite the lab's 68-78F recommendation. Keeping it to 64-68F in this Belgian single nicely restrained the banana.

Kegged White Labs half on 3/10. Moved to kegerator to force carbonate.

Transferred the Imperial Yeast half to a plastic carboy and pitched The Yeast Bay House Sour.

I get a commission if you buy something after clicking the links to MoreBeer/Amazon/Adventures in Homebrewing/Great Fermentations!


Categories: Homebrewing blogs

Beer Maturation and Yeast with John Palmer – BeerSmith Podcast #168

Homebrewing from Beersmith - Sat, 03/31/2018 - 12:04pm

John Palmer, author of “How to Brew” joins me to discuss the beer maturation process and the critical role that yeast play in beer maturation. We also discuss methods to speed up the maturation process.

Subscribe on iTunes to Audio version or Video version or on Google Play

Download the MP3 File – Right Click and Save As to download this mp3 file

Topics in This Week’s Episode (48:17)
  • Today my guest is John Palmer. John is author of the top selling beer brewing book How to Brew (Amazon affiliate link) now in its fourth edition, as well as co-author of Water and Brewing Classic Styles (Amazon affiliate links). John has a web site featuring his first edition at HowToBrew.com
  • We start with a short discussion of John’s recent trip to Mexico and why John thinks we are living in the “Golden Age” for beer brewing.
  • John recently did some presentations on yeast and beer maturation – we begin with a discussion of what the beer maturation process is.
  • We talk about how many off flavors are caused by yeast, but also how yeast play an important role in mitigating and reducing off flavors.
  • John discusses the yeast life cycle, and how it is closely related to the stages of brewing.
  • He shares his thoughts on maturation which is largely a process of reducing byproducts and waste left over from the brewing process.
  • We discuss some of the byproducts that yeast produce and also how yeast clean these up.
  • John tells us why yeast growth rate is important, as well as why pitching rates are critical for yeast health.
  • We talk about diacetyl as well as acetalaldehyde and how yeast mop these byproducts up if given the chance.
  • John shares his tips on rapid maturation of beer and we discuss the technique of cold crashing and lagering.
  • John gives us his closing thoughts.
Sponsors

Thanks to John Palmer for appearing on the show and also to you for listening!
iTunes Announcements: I launched a new video channel for the BeerSmith podcast on iTunes, so subscribe now! At the moment it will only feature the new widescreen episodes (#75 and up). Older episodes are available on my revamped Youtube channel. Also all of my audio episodes are on iTunes now – so grab the older episodes if you missed any.

Thoughts on the Podcast?

Leave me a comment below or visit our discussion forum to leave a comment in the podcast section there.

Subscribe to the Podcast on iTunes or BeerSmith Radio

You can listen to all of my podcast episodes streaming live around the clock on our BeerSmith Radio online radio station! You can also subscribe to the audio or video using the iTunes links below, or the feed address

And finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the blog and my newsletter (or use the links in the sidebar) – to get free weekly articles on home brewing.

Categories: Homebrewing blogs

Brew Dudes Homebrew Swap – Exchange #28

Brew Dudes - Fri, 03/30/2018 - 6:20pm

We have a two-fer for this exchange. This time, it’s Corey from Indiana and he sent us his Black IPA. We have gone on record stating that we are not big fans of the style since intense roast and bitterness doesn’t work well together from our perspective. Could we proven wrong by this beer? Watch […]

The post Brew Dudes Homebrew Swap – Exchange #28 appeared first on Brew Dudes.

Categories: Homebrewing blogs

Brew Dudes Homebrew Swap – Exchange #27

Brew Dudes - Fri, 03/23/2018 - 2:53am

Homebrewers like to send us their beer and we got a package with two beers from “those brew dudes” in the state of Indiana, USA. The first one we tried was brewed by a guy named Kris and it was an Extra Special Bitter or ESB. See what we thought of his beer as we […]

The post Brew Dudes Homebrew Swap – Exchange #27 appeared first on Brew Dudes.

Categories: Homebrewing blogs

PicoBrew Elysian Dragonstooth Stout Clone Review

Brew Dudes - Fri, 03/16/2018 - 3:30am

We have that Pico Pro from PicoBrew, which is fun and interesting to brew with. As a part of the initial delivery, we got two PicoPaks. The first was a Pliny the Elder clone and the other was this one that we tasted this week. If you are into big stouts or just want to […]

The post PicoBrew Elysian Dragonstooth Stout Clone Review appeared first on Brew Dudes.

Categories: Homebrewing blogs

Maple Bark and Maple Syrup Beer

The Mad Fermentationist - Mon, 03/12/2018 - 4:30pm
I'm suspicious of any "maple" beer that smells more like maple syrup than actual maple syrup does. The aromatics in real maple syrup just aren't that potent when diluted 10:1 and then fermented. Many breweries add some maple syrup (so they can put it on the label), but bolster it with extracts or maple-flavored coffee beans. Fenugreek is another, more natural, option used to flavor imitation syrups. Another approach is to add maple syrup to the chilled beer to preserve sweetness and flavor, but it doesn't make much simple sugar to overwhelm the usual beer balance.

Two years ago when I brewed my third Adambier (recipe) I added 1 quart of dark maple syrup to 5 gallons along with a cup of bourbon. The maple flavor was relatively subtle (tasting notes). After reading The Homebrewer's Almanac, I wanted to try their technique of harvesting maple bark, toasting it, and then adding it to the boil. I found the opportunity a year ago when I visited my parents. Ideally I would have used bark from a sugar maple, but the black maple in their yard was good enough for a first try.  I picked a spot that didn't have much moss growing on it and chipped off a small patch.

When I got home, I toasted the two ounces of maple maple bark in the oven until aromatic, 55 minutes at 350F. I then simmered the bark in two quarts of water for 60 minutes uncovered. After a few test blends, I opened the keg of Adambier and added one quart of the resulting liquid into about 3 gallons of beer.

Double Maple Adam

Smell – The nose has a deep blend of vanilla and caramel. The bourbon and maple work synergistically, but it doesn’t have the obvious maple flavor. Raisins or prunes are starting to come out as faint signs of oxidation. Smoke is mild, a subtle background flavor giving the beer a savory quality.

Appearance – The body is nearly opaque dark-brown, but there is clear amber right around the edges. Tight tan head. Despite the year sitting pressurized with beer gas, the head retention is good but not great. With the high alcohol (including fortification) that may be the best I can hope for.

Taste – The woodsy-vanilla flavor I got from the maple bark in present in the flavor. I could see some people confusing the slight butterscotch note with diacetyl, but I get that in the syrup as well. Smoke plays with it back and forth in the finish, more defined than the nose. Sweet thanks to subdued hop bitterness, but not sticky. Alcohol warming is mild, despite the ~11% ABV (diluted from 12% by the bark-water).

Mouthfeel – Rounded thanks to the low carbonation and creamy head.

Drinkability & Notes – It’s a unique beer. Layers of flavors that make it a strong beer that is for savoring. That’s what I want in a ~11% ABV beer, something that would be impossible to achieve at a moderate ABV.

Changes for Next Time – I’d like to try the same technique with sugar maple bark to see if that flavor is a little more reminiscent of maple syrup. That said, this worked out well as is! Maple bark isn't the only bark that works, when I visited Scratch Brewing they had a beer with toasted oak bark on that had a coffee-like note. They suggest hickory, cherry, and cedar bark too.

I also took the book's suggestion to make my own imitation maple syrup by boiling the remaining 3/4 cup of maple-bark extraction with 1.5 cups of table sugar until it reached 219F. The amber syrup has a strong vanilla-woodsy flavor, and it works nicely (especially in savory applications). Not quite real maple syrup, but more interesting than pancake (aka telephone pole) syrup!

I recently stumbled into Fallingfruit.org which is a user generated map of foragable plants. Taking the bark off a tree can be hazardous to the tree, so make sure you clear it with the person or better yet take it off a dead tree.


I get a commission if you buy something after clicking the links to MoreBeer/Amazon/Adventures in Homebrewing/Great Fermentations!
Categories: Homebrewing blogs

New Hop Products for Brewing with Mitch Steele – BeerSmith Podcast #167

Homebrewing from Beersmith - Fri, 03/09/2018 - 9:19am

Mitch Steele joins me to discuss the best use of a wide variety of hop products including whole hops, pellet hops, wet hops, hop extracts, hop oils and more.

Subscribe on iTunes to Audio version or Video version or on Google Play

Download the MP3 File – Right Click and Save As to download this mp3 file

Topics in This Week’s Episode (44:50)
  • Today my guest is Mitch Steele. Mitch is the Brewmaster and COO at New Realm Brewing in Atlanta and former Brewmaster at Stone. Mitch also wrote the book on IPAs called IPAs: Brewing Techniques and the Evolution of India Pale Ale (Amazon affiliate link). Mitch holds a degree in Fermentation Sciences from the University of California at Davis.
  • We discuss Mitch’s new brewery “New Realm” which just launched in Atlanta.
  • We start with a discussion of whole hops and how best to use them in brewing beer.
  • Next we move on to pellet hops and discuss their advantages and disadvantages as well as how to best use them.
  • Mitch shares his thoughts on working with wet hops (fresh hops off the bine) that have not been dried or processed and why its important to use them within about 24 hours.
  • We discuss “cryohops” and luplin powders including how they are made and why they are best used in the whirlpool or dry hopping.
  • Mitch talks about CO2 extracts, and how they are made and best used in the boil.
  • We discuss isomerized extracts which can be added even to a finished beer to increase bitterness.
  • Mitch explains traditional hop oils and how these can be used in brewing.
  • He discusses steam distilled hop oils including his experience with “Hopzoil”
  • We talk about aromatic hop oils and how many are now being isolated for use in brewing – i.e. you can get a single hop compound like myrcene.
  • Mitch provides his closing thoughts on the proliferation of hop products and where they are going next.
Sponsors

Thanks to Mitch Steele for appearing on the show and also to you for listening!

iTunes Announcements: I launched a new video channel for the BeerSmith podcast on iTunes, so subscribe now! At the moment it will only feature the new widescreen episodes (#75 and up). Older episodes are available on my revamped Youtube channel. Also all of my audio episodes are on iTunes now – so grab the older episodes if you missed any.

Thoughts on the Podcast?

Leave me a comment below or visit our discussion forum to leave a comment in the podcast section there.

Subscribe to the Podcast on iTunes or BeerSmith Radio

You can listen to all of my podcast episodes streaming live around the clock on our BeerSmith Radio online radio station! You can also subscribe to the audio or video using the iTunes links below, or the feed address

And finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the blog and my newsletter (or use the links in the sidebar) – to get free weekly articles on home brewing.

Categories: Homebrewing blogs

BeerSmith 2 Hack – Calculate Mash Efficiency From Brewhouse Efficiency

Brew Dudes - Fri, 03/09/2018 - 5:28am

Mash efficiency is a crucial metric when calculating a homebrew beer recipe. Using the software BeerSmith 2, it’s a bit of a challenge to modify your mash efficiency percentage because the tool uses brewhouse efficiency instead. In this post, Mike shows you what he does to work around this feature to dial in his mash […]

The post BeerSmith 2 Hack – Calculate Mash Efficiency From Brewhouse Efficiency appeared first on Brew Dudes.

Categories: Homebrewing blogs

Calculate Hop Amounts For Homebrew Recipes

Brew Dudes - Sat, 03/03/2018 - 6:13am

Since we posted information about working with percentages to calculate malt amounts in homebrew recipes, we thought we would follow up with a post about how to best calculate hop amount for homebrew recipes. Figuring out hop amounts for a recipe is similar to calculating malt amounts, as they based off of a calculation of […]

Read the original article Calculate Hop Amounts For Homebrew Recipes and other Brew Dudes posts.

Categories: Homebrewing blogs

Sapwood Cellars: Cheater Hops NE DIPA

The Mad Fermentationist - Wed, 02/28/2018 - 2:38pm
Scott and I are still pushing forward towards opening Sapwood Cellars; here's a post with our January progress. In February we've started refinishing the tasting room floors and procuring tables and chairs while we wait on equipment and licensing. That said, the biggest influence on our brewery's success may be the fate of the competing bills to change Maryland brewery laws. Paste has a good write-up. In addition to their legislative work in Annapolis, the Brewer's Association of Maryland also throws occasional beer festivals. We decided to make their Love Thy Beer: Winter Warmer Showcase our public launch. Luckily for us they pull a license that allows new unlicensed breweries to pour homebrewed test batches.

Scott brewed a split batch of NEIPA, Oat Pillows was dry hopped with Simcoe, Mosaic, and Nelson, while Concentrated was ramped up to DIPA territory with the addition of white wine grape concentrate and wine yeast then dry hopped with Nelson Sauvin and Hallertau Blanc. Both were delicious, and the wine contribution to Concentrated really worked nicely.

For Cheater Hops, my contribution, I wanted to push big flavors hoping to make it stand out in a small pour. I went on the small-end of DIPA (or the big-end of IPA) to enhance the body and mouthfeel. My pre-boil gravity was a little lower than expected, so I extended the boil. Taking a cue from this NEPA, I went heavy on hot-side Simcoe and Columbus. To increase the citrus aroma I fermented with Imperial Citrus, their version of Sacch Trois (I especially appreciate their larger pitching rate compared to White Labs on this one), a yeast I'd used in Modern Times Neverwhere and this Juicy Pale Ale.

I dry hopped the half of the batch I brought to the festival with two of my favorite varieties: Citra and Galaxy! For the half to have on tap at home I tried Belma for the first time, which is usually described as strawberry, with Moasic as a counter-point. In both cases I added a first dose of hops late-fermentation and another in the keg. Rather than cooling the keg right away as I usually do, I primed each with sugar and 1 g of CBC-1, rehydrated. This strain was selected to only ferment simpler sugars and work incredibly quickly, scavenging oxygen, allowing a week of warm storage to increase hop aroma extraction. That said, 6 oz in each dry-hop mesh tube was really pushing their capacity, 4-5 oz is likely as much as I'll add in the future.

At kegging I added 1 mL of Kalsec Hexalone to each. In addition to being foam-positive, this isomerized hop extract also increases the perception of a "rounded" body. Eventually I'll have to do a side-by-side-by-side with Tetralone (used in this Stonefruit Vanilla Nitro Sour), and without any extract to get a better sense of the contribution.

One topic that has seemingly garnered more discussion among commercial brewers than homebrewers is "hop creep." Certain hop varieties (e.g., Mosaic) contribute enzymes that free fermentable sugars. This can cause problems. If most of the yeast has already been crashed out, the few remaining cells can resume an unhealthy fermentation, often leaving diacetyl. When I was in California several brewers dialing in their NEIPAs mentioned 58F as the "magic" temperature for dry hopping; warm enough for good extraction but cool enough to inhibit the yeast. I wonder if some of these unfermented simpler-sugars contribute to the perceived sweet "juiciness" of the finished beer? In this case the gravity dropped of the half with Mosaic/Belma dropped to 1.018 in the keg while the Citra/Galaxy keg was stable at 1.020. The result was a couple foamy pours until I vented the head-space sacrificing a portion of the aroma on the Mosaic/Belma.

For the Citra-Galaxy half I wanted to bring a "clean" keg to the festival to avoid stirring up the yeast and hop-particulate, so right before heading out I filled a clean keg to the brim with StarSan and pushed it out with CO2. This removes (nearly) 100% of the oxygen, better than pressurizing and venting multiple times, while using less gas. I then jumped the beer over using the process I outlined in this post.

The festival itself was a big success! Our rebuilt jokey-box poured well, we didn't run out of beer, and we met a lot of locals who were really excited for us to open. The beers were all well received from the comments we got, and I'll take a 4.34 on Untappd for this batch.


Cheater Hops: Citra-Galaxy

Smell – Really big and bright: mango, tangerine, and pineapple. Smells Has a few green-notes, but not overtly grassy. The yeast supports those tropical and citrus notes from the hops without being obvious or phenolic. Minimal malt. Doesn’t have the “rawness” of hop aroma that some of my NEIPAs without keg conditioning have.

Appearance – Good head, but not spectacular. I’m not sure how valuable the isomerized extracts are in beers that are already so loaded with hops. They seem more valuable in sour beers which lack substantial hopping. Good level of haze, in fact hazier than most of my recent batches. Nice light yellow color with just a hint of gold.

Taste – Similar hop/yeast character to the nose, bright tropical fruit. Really saturated through the palate. Slight malt sweetness supports those flavors. Firm bitterness, in the finish, but not hop-burn on the throat.

Mouthfeel – Pleasantly full and fluffy. Carbonation is a little low on this one because I forgot to repressurize the keg after pouring it at the beer fest.

Drinkability & Notes – One of the best DIPAs I’ve brewed. The hops work together perfectly, I don’t “miss” the Citra and Galaxy on the hot-side. No dramatic color change when I left a small amount out overnight, thanks to no oats?

Changes for Next Time – Not much to change, really terrific hoppy beer that is worth the extra couple points of alcohol.
Cheater Hops: Mosaic-Belma

Smell – More subdued than the other half, perhaps thanks to venting the head space of the keg a few times. The aroma is more berry than tropical, but still has indistinct citrus notes. Doesn’t seem any greener despite still sitting on the keg hops, while the other is in a clean keg.

Appearance – Identical. I’d heard that Galaxy is especially haze-positive, but in this case both are plenty hazy without being murky.

Taste – Comes across as slightly more bitter. Maybe more hop-material in suspension thanks to the keg hops? The hop flavor is more strawberry here too, although the Mosaic prevents it from being too far from the usual. It’s a good flavor, but not as compelling.
Mouthfeel – Similar body with a little more carbonation.

Drinkability & Notes – Good, but not one of my favorite batches. Still has a nice hop flavor, but the aroma doesn’t call me back for another sip like the best DIPAs.

Changes for Next Time – The Belma shows promise, but might be better at 25% of a hop blend rather than 50%. A way to add unique flavors without having to carry the aromatic load.
Recipe

Batch Size: 12.00 gal
SRM: 4.5
IBU: 103
OG: 1.073
FG: 1.020/1.018
ABV: 7.0%/7.2%
Final pH: 5.53
Brewhouse Efficiency: 71%
Boil Time: 105 Mins

Fermentables
----------------
80.0% - 27 lbs Rahr 2-row Brewer's Malt
11.9% - 4 lbs Briess Flaked Wheat
5.9% - 2 lbs BestMälz Chit
2.2 % - 0.75 lbs Breiss Crystal 10

Mash
-------
Sacch Rest - 45 min @ 156F

Hops
-------
4.00 oz Columbus (Pellets, 14.00% AA) @ 15 min
6.00 oz Simcoe (Pellets, 9.00% AA) @ Whirlpool 30 min
4.00 oz Columbus (Pellets, 14.00% AA) @ Whirlpool 30 min
2.00 oz Amarillo (Pellets, 9.20% AA) @ Whirlpool 30 min

Mosaic/Belma
2.00 oz Belma (Pellets, 9.80% AA) @ Dry Hop Day 3
2.00 oz Mosaic (Pellets, 12.25% AA) @ Dry Hop Day 3
3.00 oz Belma (Pellets, 9.80% AA) @ Keg Hop
3.00 oz Mosaic (Pellets, 12.25% AA) @ Keg Hop
1.00 ml Hexalone (Extract, 50.00% AA) @ Keg

Citra/Galaxy
2.00 oz Citra (Pellets, 12.00% AA) @ Dry Hop Day 3
2.00 oz Galaxy (Pellets, 14.00% AA) @ Dry Hop Day 3
3.00 oz Citra (Pellets, 12.00% AA) @ Keg Hop
3.00 oz Galaxy (Pellets, 14.00% AA) @ Keg Hop
1.00 ml Hexalone (Extract, 50.00% AA) @ Keg

Other
-------
16 g Gypsum (Calcium Sulfate) @ Mash
9 g Calcium Chloride @ Mash
5 tsp Lactic Acid @ Mash
1 Whirlfloc Tablet @ 5 min
CalciumChlorideSulfateSodiumMagnesiumCarbonate1108016010545
Yeast
-------
Imperial #A20 Citrus

Notes
-------
Brewed 1/14/18

Made a 2.5L starter on 1/12/18, yeast was 6 months old, but it started working quickly. 24 hours on a stir-plate.

All hops 2017 Harvest, except Simcoe (2014).

11 gallons filtered DC, 6 gallons of distilled for the mash. All salts and 2 tsp of lactic acid at the start. Measured pH at 5.51 (at mash temp), added 2 more tsp of lactic acid to 5.29, and 1 last tsp to 5.25 (~5.4-5.45 at room temp).

Collected 16 gallons of 1.060 wort. Extended boil to achieve target gravity. Chilled to 70F, shook to aerate, pitched.

Fermentation internal temperature relatively steady at 67-68F internal.

1/17/18 Dry hopped both halves in primary, loose.

1/26/18 Transferred both to kegs with the additional doses of dry hops and 1 mL of Hexalone. Also added 3 oz of table sugar and 1 g of rehydrated CBC-1. Left at 65F to carbonate. FG on both is 1.020

2/15/18 Jumped the Citra/Galaxy half to a keg that I had filled with StarSan and then pushed out with CO2. Served at Love Thy Beer: Winter Warmer Showcase.

I get a commission if you buy something after clicking the links to MoreBeer/Amazon/Adventures in Homebrewing/Great Fermentations!
Categories: Homebrewing blogs

Brewing New England IPAs with Michael Tonsmeire – BeerSmith Podcast #166

Homebrewing from Beersmith - Mon, 02/26/2018 - 1:55pm

Michael Tonsmeire joins me this week to discuss brewing New England India Pale Ale styles along with a few new projects including his brewery “Sapwood Cellars” opening in Columbia, MD.

Subscribe on iTunes to Audio version or Video version or on Google Play

Download the MP3 File – Right Click and Save As to download this mp3 file

Topics in This Week’s Episode (47:08)
  • Today my guest is Michael Tonsmeire. Michael is the author of the book Sour Beers (Amazon affiliate link) as well as the blog The Mad Fermentationist. Michael is an award winning brewer and BJCP judge, and is opening a new brewery called “Sapwood Cellars” in Columbia, MD this summer.
  • We start with a brief discussion of Michael’s new brewery “Sapwood Cellars”.
  • Michael explains the New England IPA style, which though not formally defined has recently become popular.
  • We discuss the history of the style, which started only about 6 years ago.
  • Michael tells us the key differences between the NE IPA and a typical West Coast IPA.
  • We talk about the haze and how the cloudiness in the beer comes about.
  • Michael shares his thoughts on the appropriate grain bill to use for this IPA.
  • We discuss which hop varieties are appropriate for a New England IPA as well as hop schedules.
  • Michael talks about the “fluffy” or “pillowy” mouthfeel for a New England IPA
  • He shares his thoughts about mash schedules, yeast and fermentation
  • We talk about why NE IPAs are oxygen sensitive.
  • He gives us some advice on related styles as well as final tips on NE IPAs.
  • We discuss the upcoming launch of Michael’s new brewery called “Sapwood Cellars” opening in Columbia, MD this summer.
Sponsors

Thanks to Michael Tonsmeire for appearing on the show and also to you for listening!

iTunes Announcements: I launched a new video channel for the BeerSmith podcast on iTunes, so subscribe now! At the moment it will only feature the new widescreen episodes (#75 and up). Older episodes are available on my revamped Youtube channel. Also all of my audio episodes are on iTunes now – so grab the older episodes if you missed any.

Thoughts on the Podcast?

Leave me a comment below or visit our discussion forum to leave a comment in the podcast section there.

Subscribe to the Podcast on iTunes or BeerSmith Radio

You can listen to all of my podcast episodes streaming live around the clock on our BeerSmith Radio online radio station! You can also subscribe to the audio or video using the iTunes links below, or the feed address

And finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the blog and my newsletter (or use the links in the sidebar) – to get free weekly articles on home brewing.

Categories: Homebrewing blogs

Brew Dudes Homebrew Swap – Exchange #26

Brew Dudes - Sat, 02/24/2018 - 4:48am

The beer swaps keep rolling in and we get an American Brown ale from a guy named Chris in our own home state of Massachusetts. He wanted us to try his take on this American take on an English classic. Let’s see what we thought of his beer. Chris’ American Brown Ale Recipe Here’s what […]

Read the original article Brew Dudes Homebrew Swap – Exchange #26 and other Brew Dudes posts.

Categories: Homebrewing blogs

Aromatic Hop Oils in Beer Brewing – Part 1

Homebrewing from Beersmith - Fri, 02/23/2018 - 2:57pm

This week I take a look at a few of the most significant aromatic hop oils and the role they play in beer. I also found a great link to an interactive chart where you can explore the oil content of many hop varieties.

Aromatic Hop Oils

Hop oils contain well over 500 flavor compounds, many of which are transformed during brewing, fermentation and aging in interesting ways. Most brewers are familiar with alpha acids, represented by the alpha percentage shown on the package. These alpha acids are isomerized during the boil (or steep/whirlpool at high temperature) to provide the majority of the bitterness we taste in beer.

Of great interest in recent years are the more delicate aromatic hop oils in hops. These compounds provide a lot of the hop character and aroma we associate with modern craft beers, and are especially critical in the recent wave of India Pale Ales.

Aromatic hop oils, by there very nature, hard to get into solution and difficult to keep in solution. Being aromatic, these compounds are all somewhat insoluble and like to volatilize or have low boiling points. That’s why they don’t do well in the boil and require a whirlpool/steep or dry hop addition to maintain their aromatic punch.

Here’s an interactive chart that shows the hop oil content of major varieties. While its from 2014, it gives you a good idea of how various varieties stack up. If you click on it, it will open the original chart which I’ve also linked here:

There are several dozen aromatic oils in hops, but a few key ones dominate. Here are the major aromatic hop oils in terms of percentages:

  • Myrcene – The most significant hop oil, making up from 30-60% of total hop oils in most varieties. Myrcene is often described as the “fresh hop oil” and has flavors and aroma varying from herbaceous to resinous, green, balsamic, and slightly metallic. It is a major component in many hop varieties from the Pacific Northwest, and is therefore a critical oil in IPAs. Cascade, for example has a myrcene content of nearly 60%. Myrcene has a low boiling point and is highly volatile. In fact it will virtually disappear in most boil additions, and even tends to be volatile in higher temperature whirlpool/steeping additions. It also oxidizes very rapidly, and is probably best used in dry hop applications.
  • Humulene – The second largest hop oil by percentage, humulene makes up between 12% and 50% of total hop oils. Humulene is responsible for earthy and spicy flavors found in traditional noble hops. While humulene has a higher boiling point (around 210 F or 98.9 C), it is very volatile and hydrophobic, so it is still best used in the whirlpool or dry hopping. Humulene is also easily oxidized, though the oxidized humulene-epoxide III play a major role in the flavor of varieties like Hallertauer Mittelfrüh.
  • Caryophyllene- Caryophyllene makes up between 6% and 15% of total hop oils in most varieties. It is a major compound in many aromatic plants including cloves, cannabis, rosemary, and hops. It is also a major aromatic compound in black pepper. The aroma is described as woody, earthy, and peppery though it also has a strong herbal component. The spicy, woody aroma is often evident when you crush dried hops in your hands. Many English hop varieties such as East Kent Goldings have the largest percentage of caryphyllene giving them a woody, earthy finish. While not quite as volatile as myrcene, caryophyllene it will boil quickly and is best used in the whirlpool or as a dry hop.

That covers the “big three” aromatic hop oils. In part 2 next week I’ll cover some of the smaller, but still significant hop oils. I do highly recommend you click on the hop chart above which has some great data for popular varieties.

Thanks for joining me on the BeerSmith Home Brewing Blog. Be sure to sign up for my newsletter or my podcast (also on itunes…and youtube…and streaming radio station) for more great tips on homebrewing. Also check out the How to Brew Video series I shot with John Palmer if you want to learn more about all grain brewing.

Categories: Homebrewing blogs

Working With Percentages – Homebrew Beer Recipes

Brew Dudes - Fri, 02/16/2018 - 9:24am

Homebrewing is a great community and one way we share ideas is through recipes. For this post, we thought it would be good to discuss expressing recipes in a way that helps another brewer translate your formulation as closely as possible to what you brewed on your system. Let’s learn about how to present homebrew […]

Read the original article Working With Percentages – Homebrew Beer Recipes and other Brew Dudes posts.

Categories: Homebrewing blogs

Mashmaker and Craft Malts with Michael Dawson – BeerSmith Podcast #165

Homebrewing from Beersmith - Tue, 02/13/2018 - 8:11am

Michael Dawson joins me to discuss his new book “Mashmaker” as well as the emergence of some unique craft beer malts.

Subscribe on iTunes to Audio version or Video version or on Google Play

Download the MP3 File – Right Click and Save As to download this mp3 file

Topics in This Week’s Episode (45:30)
  • Today my guest is Michael Dawson from BSG. Michael is the author of the new book Mashmaker, and founding member of the original “Brewing TV”. Michael is an editor for BYO magazine, BJCP certified beer judge and writes for the “Growler Magazine”. He just published his new book “Mashmaker – a Citizen-Brewer’s Guide to Making Great Beer at Home”.
  • We start with a brief discussion of what Michael has been up to since last appearing on the podcast.
  • Michael gives us a brief overview of his new book “Mashmaker”
  • We discuss the main topic for this weeks’ show: malts and craft malting. Michael starts with a description of the basic groups of malts and how they are used.
  • He explains the malting process and how the four major groups of malts are malted and then kilned.
  • We talk about barley varieties and how a few major barley varieties dominated the US market for many years.
  • Michael explains heritage malts, many of which disappeared over the last 100 years, and how some growers and malsters are trying to introduce long lost malts to the craft beer industry.
  • We discuss a few specific heritage varieties that are now available to home brewers: Crisp Plumage/Archer and Crisp Chevalier.
  • Michael tells us about his experience brewing with heritage malts.
  • We discuss the concept of “terroir” and how the flavor of a malt reflects the region it is grown in. Michael shares one malt specifically grown in Northern Italy as an example: Weyermann Eraclea Pilsner.
  • Michael gives us his thoughts on craft malting as well as small barley farms that are driving a “buy local” trend in beer ingredients.
  • We spend a few minutes at the end talking about his book “Mashmaker” and Michael shares a few of the stories in the book that go with his many beer recipes.
  • Michael shares his closing thoughts on completing his first brewing book.
Sponsors

Thanks to Michael Dawson for appearing on the show and also to you for listening!

iTunes Announcements: I launched a new video channel for the BeerSmith podcast on iTunes, so subscribe now! At the moment it will only feature the new widescreen episodes (#75 and up). Older episodes are available on my revamped Youtube channel. Also all of my audio episodes are on iTunes now – so grab the older episodes if you missed any.

Thoughts on the Podcast?

Leave me a comment below or visit our discussion forum to leave a comment in the podcast section there.

Subscribe to the Podcast on iTunes or BeerSmith Radio

You can listen to all of my podcast episodes streaming live around the clock on our BeerSmith Radio online radio station! You can also subscribe to the audio or video using the iTunes links below, or the feed address

And finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the blog and my newsletter (or use the links in the sidebar) – to get free weekly articles on home brewing.

Categories: Homebrewing blogs

Brew Dudes Homebrew Swap – Exchange #25

Brew Dudes - Fri, 02/09/2018 - 11:13am

Hey – we got some beer mail filled with homebrewed beer. We get homebrew from time to time, been doing this for a while since this is our homebrew exchange number 25! Let’s see what we have on the menu for this go around. Dessert Porter Tasting Notes Brian from Ohio sent us this beer […]

Read the original article Brew Dudes Homebrew Swap – Exchange #25 and other Brew Dudes posts.

Categories: Homebrewing blogs

Reiterated Mash Experiment – Russian Imperial Stout

Brew Dudes - Fri, 02/02/2018 - 10:14am

Last year, I tried to make a couple of high gravity beers and I wasn’t able to hit my targeted original gravity. You can see some of trials in these previous posts. In an attempt to fix this issue, we tried a reiterated mash experiment with a Russian Imperial Stout recipe. If you have the […]

Read the original article Reiterated Mash Experiment – Russian Imperial Stout and other Brew Dudes posts.

Categories: Homebrewing blogs

Beer Blending Strategies for Home Brewers

Homebrewing from Beersmith - Tue, 01/30/2018 - 8:11pm

This week I take a look at the often overlooked topic of blending two beers either to correct a flawed beer or make a more complex finished beer.

Why Blend Your Beers

The vast majority of beers are made in a straightforward way – you brew a recipe, ferment, age and enjoy it. While this is great when everything in your recipe works perfectly, life is not always perfect.

Many wine makers, by contrast, are master blenders. The “Bordeaux” style, for instance, is crafted from a number of different wines blended after fermentation. Blending the wines produces high quality but also consistency in flavor from year to year.

Blending beer lets you correct minor and even major flaws in a brew, and in some cases also lets you produce a beer that would otherwise be very difficult or time consuming to create using traditional methods. So rather than dumping a brew that did not turn out just right, I encourage you to think outside the box and blend your way to a better beer.

Blending to Correct a Flawed Beer

One of the first applications of blending is to correct a flawed beer. You can do this either by blending in a beer you already have on hand or brewing a beer to specifically address the flaw in your first beer.

Lets look at brewing a beer specifically to blend with a flawed beer. This is easiest to do when the beer has an obvious imbalance such as too much or two little bitterness, a thin or overly heavy body, or an obvious flavor issue such as too much roast flavor. In this case the antidote is obvious – brew a beer that will correct the flaw. If the original is over-hopped, then you under-hop the second beer. If too thin, then make another with the same recipe but too much body. The goal is to generate a beer that, blended with the original, produces a balanced finish.

A second strategy is to brew a “cover-up” beer. This approach can be used to “cover up” flaws in the original beer, and can be used to correct more extreme off-flavors. Usually this means brewing a dark, heavy beer who’s flavors will mask any flaws in the original beer. For example a pale ale with an obvious flaw like DMS (a cooked corn flavor) could easily be corrected if I blend it with a heavy stout to produce a blended porter. You could take a light lager with flaws and make a dark bock beer to produce a dark lager. A light beer that has some souring from an infection could be blended with a heavier sour beer to make an intentionally soured beer to make a sour style.

Blending to Create a Particular Flavor

A third strategy I use for blending beer is joining two beers to create a specific desired flavor. Here we may not be correcting a flaw but instead simply adding a flavor to make an otherwise dull beer interesting. You can blend two beers you already have on hand – such as an Imperial Stout and a Sour, or brew a beer to blend. This can also be done with fruits, flavorings, sours, hop extracts and spices.

For example you could blend a sour beer or directly add lactic acid into an otherwise normal ale to create a sour ale. Add fruit flavoring, or fermented fruits to taste to make your own fruit beer. Add a spiced tea with your favorite spices to taste to spice your beer to the exact level you like. You can use isomerized hop extracts to add hop flavor after your beer is completely done to get a different finish or bitterness level. Add liquors or bourbon to the finished beer to give it a fruit, spiced or even bourbon barrel aged finish without the barrel. Add mead to a beer to create a braggot.

For this approach I find it best to start with a fixed amount of beer, say 100 ml, and then add a measured amount of the flavoring (or flavored beer) until I get the precise flavor balance I want. Once you have the right mixing proportions simply scale it up to the size of the batch you’ve made to get the right balance up front.

So the next time you brew a beer that did not come out perfect, don’t dump it – blend it! Thanks for joining me on the BeerSmith Home Brewing Blog. Be sure to sign up for my newsletter or my podcast (also on itunes…and youtube…and streaming radio station) for more great tips on homebrewing. Also check out the How to Brew Video series I shot with John Palmer if you want to learn more about all grain brewing.

Categories: Homebrewing blogs

Pages